Posts Tagged With: Foote

Bergen to Jostedalsbreen National Park

After 2 days we are leaving Bergen but not without seeing the stave church (a wooden church built by the Vikings). There are 28 stave churches in the country but this one is going to be our first one. Unfortunately it is not original anymore but has been rebuilt.

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Driving along road 16, we pass the Tvinnefoss, a majestic and very impressive waterfall. It has been raining a lot last night so there is a vast amount of water coming down. At the tourist shop I then find a postcard of the waterfall in winter: completely frozen!!! Absolutely amazing.
We also buy some more lures to be able to go fishing in lakes as well. Before Gudvangen we spend the night at a lake but again Logan doesn’t catch any fish. This lake may actually be too far away from the fjords and only have smaller fish…?

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The next day we are driving through the world’s longest road tunnel. 24.5km of boring blackness? No, when you make it to quarter, half and three quarters of the tunnel, you will see a spectacularly lit up part of the tunnel, reminding me of an ice cave.

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After the tunnel we take a right turn to get to Borgund where one of Norway’s oldest and best preserved stave churches is located. On the way we drive past a former excavation site where Viking combs, jewelry, keys and other objects have been found when building a new road from Bergen to Oslo in 2009.

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Borgund Stave Church:

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Eventually we turn around, taking the historic route, and cross one of the many arms of the Sognefjord with the ferry, to get to Jostedalsbreen National Park, the place with the largest glacier on the European mainland.
One of the many glacier tongues is the Nigardsbreen glacier. The last part of the road is actually a toll road, we pay 30NOK and get there just in time before sunset. Unfortunately the sun is only still reaching the mountain peaks, not the glacier anymore but we still get to see the fascinating shades of blue in the ice. A raging current is coming out underneath the glacier, forming a lake.
The glacier was measured to move up to 1.5m downward per day, therefore it is not the safest place to be in. We take some footage and enjoy a few minutes of looking into the icy blue colours of the giant before we have to leave.

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All roads lead to Rome

This morning some police walked by and told us we have to move the van… something we expected, but at least we got away with it for one night. After a second search we strike gold, we can’t believe it! A spot on a smaller street right in the heart of Rome, virtually across the street from the Vittoriano (the Monument of Victor Emanuel) and just down the street from the Colosseum. Image

Now we need to work out what we want to see. We decide we first need to find an Internet café to print out some information about Rome, so we don’t walk about aimlessly. On the way we pass some interesting sites.

     

The Vittoriano is such an impressive building, made of white marble featuring Corinthian columns, fountains, an equestrian statue of Victor Emmanuel, two statues of the Goddess Victoria and an eternal flame. Built between 1885 and 1911 it was built to commemorate the achievements of Victor Emmanuel, the Italian king who was successful in the unification of Italy in 1870.

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The Trajan forum is across the street, which was completed around 113 AD and in its time was considered one of the architectural wonders of the world. Today it is a mere shadow of its former self, however still very impressive to witness such amazing architecture that still remains after almost 2000 years. Image

The Internet café is a long walk and it turns out to be cheaper to purchase a book on Rome, than to print out the pages we need. We also purchase the Rome Pass, which gives us entry into 3 different museums/monuments. Having finished lunch in our van, we decide to head down the main road towards the Colosseum. We can see a lot of other impressive monuments along the way, like the Forum of Caesar, but these can wait. We have our sites set on the mighty Colosseum. Even in today’s standards, it stands as an imposing structure. Completed in 80 AD, this huge amphitheater could house some 55,000 spectators. I can’t stop thinking of the ancient battles that took place here so long ago.

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I just read in our trusty tourist book that the games usually started with comical acts and displays of exotic animals, but what the crowds really came for were the Gladiator battles. Most Gladiators fought wild animals such as lions and tigers but would also fight each other, usually to the death. We were told that there are more tourists in Rome than Italians and today I think this is the case. However, we manage to dodge most of the line up due to our Rome Pass, allowing us to bypass the ticket cue. We spend about an hour walking around inside, taking photos, videoing and imagining what it would have been like all those years ago. While still largely intact, an earthquake in 847 AD caused a large section on the southern side to collapse, nevertheless well worth the visit.

  

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We head back towards the van and attempt to check out more of the Forum along the way but unfortunately we are too late; the gates are closed, so settle for a view from the nearby footpath.   Although the street we are parked on is narrow and appears not to be a main road, it seems to be the route of the many tourist buses that circle the city all day. Our van is the first vehicle after the corner, which is a possible target for a crazy Italian bus driver. The first chance I get I think I will move it forward to give them ample space.

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Locorotondo and the Trulli of Alberobello

Logan read about Locorotondo being one of the most picturesque towns in Southern Italy, so we were curious about this. On the way I did some more research and stumbled over a place called Alberobello said to have cone shaped houses, only a couple of kilometres from Locorotondo.

First we explore the lovely little town of Locorotondo and stroll through the small alleyways gazing at the pretty white houses. The view from the top of the town is fantastic and we get to see some of the cone shaped houses from here. They are called Trulli.

 

 

 

       

        

On the way to Alberobello these Trulli seem to get more and more. First of all we are following the camper sign to find a place to park and stay the night. Up on the hill we find a nice spot to camp and then ride down with the bicycles to the town district with the Trulli.

It’s the first time we see tourists in a while! There are actually a lot of Italian holidayers. And then I catch a glimpse of an old lady sitting outside of her Trullo.

 

The cone shaped dome is actually of oriental origin introduced into Puglia by tribes from Asia Minor. The word “Trullo” derives from the Greek word “tholos”, which refers to a circular dome-shaped construction. On the highest part of the face of the cone, very ancient Pagan and Christian symbols were painted in white chalk. Symbols with magic and proprietary powers, all pointing in the directon of the first deity: the sun.

 

The roundish head of the pinnacles is meant to represent the link with the solar sphere and it is more noticeable in older trulli.

Originally some people used to put drawings of the horoscopes of the people who lived in the house on the house itself so as to bring good luck. The pagan symbols represented animals and human motifs connected with superstition and used to be put on the cones for protection. Finally ornamental symbols had only a decorative role and alluded to persons or particular situations.

In 1926, the Monti Quarter, St. Anthony’s Church was built, according to the traditional local trullo building technique.

We walk down the labyrinth-like alleyways and get a lot of footage of the cute little houses.

I couldn’t resist but buy a small 1Euro Trullo for myself which is now attached to our camera bag. We are also offered some home made chocolate liquor and cookies, gosh are they tasty!!!

Back at the campsite we enjoy a nice warm shower, do some laundry and actually wash the van from the outside. It was about time!

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Manfredonia and Gargano NP

 

We are getting our push bikes ready to discover Manfredonia today. First we are riding along the (polluted – for Australian standards) beach and then head into the city. The cliffs in the background look interesting to us and we are planning on driving up there after some sightseeing in Manfred.

 

Most of the city’s buildings are white and joint to each other with balconies. The streets are small but since it’s Sunday, everyone is out on the streets and walking into the cathedral.

 

We are riding back to our van and then make our way to the Gargano National Park (the home of Gargamel – I’m kidding!). To get there we have to drive very high up over the

cliff and mountains on which Monte Sant’ Angelo is situated. The views are impressive but we keep going further inland, into the National Park, where we find ourselves a beautiful little spot in the ancient forest, covered with a green canopy.

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Italy’s Spur – Pischici and Manfredonia

Another shower experience! This time it’s different, so I feel like sharing this fun story once again! The shower at Azzurro Lido needs tokens to work. My first mission is to find the owner. Equipped with a towel and my toiletry bag, I search for Mr. Azzurro Lido all over the campsite, including the house, when all of the sudden the alarm goes off. I’m sure that at least now he’ll turn up somewhere. But he doesn’t! I then see some smoke trailing behind an old caravan and find him and his wife cooking a BBQ. His wife is getting a token out of the house and exchanges it with me for 2Euros. I assume that the time is limited, so I get undressed first, before inserting the token. Then I pop in the token and quickly get my hair wet under the still cold water (don’t want to waste time). All of the sudden the water gets boiling hot and there is no way of changing the temperature as there is no tab. I step aside from the water and quickly get shampoo in my hair and over my body. The boiling hot water burns my feet and I force myself to at least quickly rinse the foam out of my hair. The moment I step under the water, the water flow stops! WHAT IS THAT? A 30 SECOND SHOWER??? I’m full of shampoo foam everywhere, including my eyes! Half blind I reach outside, hoping the token may have come out – no luck! My eyes burn and I’m so frustrated, a few tears are flowing. I paid 2 Euros for this shower and would have been better off washing myself with a hose! Well all the frustration doesn’t help, so I walk over to the tab which is for cleaning your feet and squeeze underneath to rinse the shampoo out of my hair and then splash it over me, to rinse myself too. Lucky there is only a few people on the beach, quite far away, not knowing I’m half naked and blind.

When I tell Logan about my lovely experience, he is laughing. He had the same experience yesterday but he was given two tokens for 2 Euros and he didn’t wash his hair.

All batteries charged up we leave Azzurro Lido and drive through Pischici. The very steep and tight streets make it hard not to damage our Globetrotter. At times, I have to get out and guide Logan through between cars and walls, only having 1-2cm on each side!!! At one point we realise all our fresh water is running out of the pipe. Just out of nothing! Oh no! What did we damage now?? We find out, it’s only a valve that needed to be turned back and everything was closed again. Phew!

We soon keep going and choose to stop along the coast at a few lookouts. The dramatic cliffs and small coves are picture-perfect!

  

  

  

The road leads us to Manfredonia. The architecture shows signs of Greek influences, probably because the city was settled by the Greeks in ancient times. We only drive through once and then go grocery shopping in a nice shopping centre, before finding ourselves a car park next to a small takeaway bar.

Logan got motivated and is having a bottle of vodka tonight and soon is feeling social again, talking to some strange characters at the take-away bar next to our van. “Oh no”, I’m thinking. I hear him talking about our travels and I really hope the person he is talking to, and the two dodgy looking Italians behind him, are good people, since we are planning on staying the night and next day here and I wouldn’t appreciate any visitors or people stealing things from our van.

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Campervans are a farmer’s annoyance

In the morning we are awoken by the beeping horn of the farmer’s tractor. Quickly Logan jumps up and moves the van out of the way. Getting out of the many fields, turns out to be quite a challenge though! Heavy rain last night filled up the small tracks with muddy puddles. We have to turn around twice and our last option leaves us with a large puddle and a steep track up a hill.

Are we gonna make it?:                                                Rolling fields:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Logan gets out and walks barefoot through the water, to check the firmness of the ground and here we go: we drive through steadily and indeed make the crossing. Lucky! Soon we are back on the main street, heading east towards the Adriatic Sea and discover that the coastline is just changing to a more beautiful scenery. We are having breakfast in a small village on the beach and then keep going south.

Breakfast on the beach:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The mountains are now encroaching upon the coast, giving it a more dramatic feel. Italy’s spur (of the boot) presents itself with a beautiful mountainous national park and stunning beaches and seaside villages.

While driving along the coast, we discover a small campsite just before Pischici, called Azzurro Lido. Located right on the beach, we can’t resist but make this today’s final stop and relax surrounded by views of the sea, beach, fields and Pischici, perched up high on the hill.

Azzurro Lido:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s last exciting event was when I managed to drown my new iPhone 4S completely in water! Screaming, I picked it out of the water and blew it dry. It still works! Phew!!!

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L’Aquila and Campo Imperatore

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First thing in the morning Logan tries to get us out of these grass mounts and mud. It doesn’t work. I suggest to have breakfast first and think about how we want to try it best before anything worse happens. While eating we discuss how we can possibly get traction under the tires and manoeuvre the van out of these two mounts. We then collect gravel and flat stones to put before and behind the tires. It takes about 3 goes of changing stones around we finally make it over the mount and are out. If we hadn’t lost our pipe before, we surely would have then. Only seconds later the wheels spin again. It is too muddy! I then navigate Logan backwards past the mounts and back onto the sealed road. Phew! (Video footage will follow on YouTube!!)
Let’s just get out of here; I need a change of scenery to get my mind off the mishappenings from last night.

Logan picked out a hike up Corno Grande, starting from Campo Imperatore. It is the highest glacier in Southern Europe, ideal walking times between July and September. (We have April!) While I like hiking, Logan keeps picking out these challenges and I don’t really know if I like the idea of hiking up a snow covered glacier in this nasty weather. We definitely want electricity for tonight and choose a campsite near Campo Imperatore.

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Upon arrival we have to realise thatit is closed. So is the gondola to the Campo Imperatore and even the hotels look deserted. We drive to L’Aquila, the “capital” of Abruzzo in search for a camping spot. I found two on google. The first one turns out to be a car dealer, selling mobile homes, and the second one simply doesn’t exist. The search is not made easy by all the barricades throughout the entire city. Soon we realise, L’Aquila has been victim to a strong earthquake in 2009 and has been destroyed badly. Scaffold is holding

up and supporting entire buildings. People are working everywhere. Not having found a place to stay, we decide to go back to Fonte Cerreto, near Campo Imperatore, to be able to start our hike early tomorrow morning. We park up on a round car park in front of the hotels and keep looking around for a possibility to get electricity.
We honestly tried to find a campsite and were willing to pay for electricity and I’m now quite scared of having to freeze again tonight. Across the street is this hot dog van parked up and he’s plugged into a socket… Hm… We keep watching it for a couple of hours and once it gets dark, we park right behind him and sneakily steal power for the next 8 hours, being able to run our heater and watch a movie tonight. Let’s just not tell anyone. 😉 Oh, and I could finally iron the wax off the kitchen bench and put a flower sticker over the burnt area from last night. Out of sight, out of mind! Now we just to find a welder soon, to re-attach our waste water pipe!

View from our camp spot:

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Hunting for electricity:                                                Sticker over the burnt kitchen bench. Fixed – for now!

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Monti Sibillini National Park

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The weather has cleared up a little and we hit the road down to Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini. Monte Sibilla is one of over 20 peaks above 2000m and the park is home to over 50 species of mammals, including wolves, porcupines, wild cats and martens. On the way to Montemonaco, our starting point, we decide to go for the 18km Sibillini Traverse, which is said to have breath-taking views. During our 2-hour drive, we get to see spectacular views of the mountain peaks, some of them still covered in snow.
Finally in Montemonaco, we don’t exactly know how to find the “Refugi di Sibilla” , the actual starting point of the walk, as described in the “Hiking in Italy” Lonely Planet.

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We follow the road and a few signs saying “Monti Sibillini National Park” but there are many walks in this National Park. The road leads up a fairly steep Mountain and turns into a gravel road soon after. We zick zack up the mountain and I keep telling myself: “This can’t be it! This is insane!” The cliff next to us drops down a few hundred meters and the Globetrotter is working hard to climb meter by meter. It took about 15-20min but felt like an hour and we finally reach a hut. This is the rifugio! A sign hanging above the closed door reads its name. I take a few deep breaths and sigh in relief that we finally made it. Hungry, we are having a quick lunch and then get our gear on.

With hardly a trek visible, we follow little paths and a few poles stuck in the ground as way finders. We partly ignore the actual path and walk up the steep cliff, making slow progress, as my breath can’t be fast enough to get the oxygen into my brain. Every so often we have to stop but it’s not like we haven’t got an amazing view over Le Marche and even the Adriatic sea in the distance.

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Logan is first on top of the ridge and from his reaction I gather it must be a good view from up there. When I arrive seconds later, the view just blows me  a-w-a-y! I expected a valley with green hills on the other side. Instead we see a steep cliff and massive mountains around it. It felt a bit like standing on the ridge of a volcano and looking into the inside.

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We then walk along the ridge for over an hour, through snow and over rocks and grass; the 360-degree views impressing us all the way. In front of us lies Monte Sibilla, a stunning peak and the one the national park is named after. I’m feeling a little exhausted and we haven’t got much time anymore as the weather changes on the horizon. I know Logan would like to climb it quickly, so I tell him to leave everything with me and run up to the top with his go pro camera. He thinks it’s a great idea and is off a coupe of minutes later. Meanwhile I enjoy the stunning views in every direction and take some panorama photos with my iPhone 4S. There is a steep bit that needs to be climbed via a rope and I lose sight of Logan there. Soon after I see him at the top, both his arms stretched into the air. Then I even hear him! He does a sort of “howl” and I’m surprised how far the sound travels. I’m whistling back. About 15min later he is back at where I waited and we wander back together, cutting down the mountain diagonally to save some time. It is very steep and rocks are lying around everywhere. Walking sidewards makes you tired a bit so I turn on Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” and jokingly dance down the mountain. Yupp, Logan caught that on camera

and yupp, it will be on YouTube soon!

After probably about an hour, we are back at the van and Logan shouts out: “SHIT FRANNY!!!!” I think, someone must have broken into our van and run after him. “The car lights are still on!” Logan jumps inside and turns them off. I’m thinking this must be a joke!!! The imagination of having to push and roll the van down the zick-zack gravel mountain road turns my stomach upside down. The thought that I might even have to sit inside because only Logan is strong enough to push it makes me especially nervous. Logan jumps in to try and start the engine. While I’m still in panic, I suddenly hear the engine turn on
like nothing ever happened. “WHAT?” I say surprised. How is that possible? We are very lucky and I’m so relieved.
Time to go “home” to Colmurano…

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Ljubljana and Izola in Slovenia

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Day 4 (by Francy)

Last night I had to turn off the heater because it got too warm in the van. I was expecting to wake up freezing but no, it’s actually still nice and cosy, even though it’s raining outside. Logan is off for another run up a hill in the distance. There is an old ruin on top on the hill and the stairs were beautifully lit up at night time. Unfortunately the hotel doors are closed and therefore the access to the toilets! Weren’t we paying for electricity, water and t o i l e t s ? Maybe this is how things work in Slovenia.

Since we are still Wohnmobil-virgins I’m now excited to announce that we are about to empty our grey water the very first time. It may sound like a ridiculously easy task but in my head I’m playing through all sorts of dramatic scenarios. First of all I have to direct Logan (driving backwards) around another mobile home and then over the tiny grey water drain. Once that was managed successfully, I try my hardest to open the tab underneath our Globetrotter but it won’t open. Panic sets in! Then Logan marches to the tab and turns it as if he was Thor. A shame he couldn’t prove this ability back on the first day when we needed to fill up diesel and couldn’t open the tank!

A huge load of water is being released into the drain and we are quite surprised how much water we have used within four days. This also means that our fresh water tank is missing quite a bit, so we fill that one up with a hose provided by the site.

Ljubljana, Slovenia’s capital city, is only a few kilometres away and I’m quite curious how it may look like. As we drive into town, I feel being set back in time. The buildings look the same as the GDR style “Plattenbau”. Basically that means it’s post-war residential housing or box-shaped, grey and boring looking units. While Germany is trying to reduce the number of “Plattenbau” buildings, Ljubljana still seems to be dominated by this kind of architecture. On the other hand there are also many older style buildings in the city centre, which give the city a real character. We are positively surprised by the many green trees, bushes, flowers and parks throughout the entire city. Spring is definitely underway. There even is a fortress on a hill that we drive underneath, through a tunnel. Many people stare at our van and two young lads waving and laughing at us when I point the camera at them.

On the way to Izola, a beach-side town in Slovenia, we have to take the highway as I can’t see any main roads on my rather superficial map. This means we also have to buy a vignette (a toll sticker for the highway) for 15 Euros as otherwise we can get fined 800(!!!) Euros. I wasn’t actually aware of that amount yesterday when we drove on Slovenia’s highway for a few hours without the vignette. Oops!

We pass some beautiful mountainous landscape, bridges, forests, caves and road signs with rainclouds on them. I’m puzzled. Is it always raining here I think jokingly?! It actually just means that the streets may be slippery when wet but I still think that sign alone doesn’t really explain itself.

Just before Izola we see the Adriatic ocean the very first time. It is so flat and calm that at first you could think it’s the sky. The grey-blue colour of the sky and the sea are just the same and the horizon is hard to find. It is here that we also see the first cypress trees that are so famous for the Mediterranean countries.

The plan is to find the free camping site with electricity near Izola port that is advertised in my “Board Atlas”. I think we found it but Logan still wants to check out this little area near the water since there were a few campers parked up there. Once we stop, a German fellow (in his 60ies) starts talking to us through our closed window. Logan winds it down and the German man repeats: “Pretty old van! You had many problems with it, haven’t you?!” Cigarette smoke enters our van. I responded: “No actually we haven’t at all”. He then points out that the car park over there is actually 15 Euros a night and the electricity isn’t working but where we are parked now, this is a private car park and the police can’t say anything. He also warns us not to go to Croatia as it’s too corrupt and free camping is not only being punished with a 80 Euro fine per person but also with them taking away all your papers and charging you for being an illegal immigrant. Any visitor to Croatia needs to be reported to the police when entering the country and it needs to be clear where you are staying. All this didn’t sound too nice, so we decided to head to Italy tomorrow instead.

Now we can’t seem to get rid of this man though. Every time I say: “Thank you for the information. We are going to have a look around now.” He starts talking again just as I want to turn around. It takes about 4 or 5 tries until we can finally walk away and check out the ocean.

Logan and I decide we are going to try out our (early) Easter present: a fishing rod. On the boulders, 20m in front of our van, we try to catch some fish but the fact that the water is very clear and we can’t seem to see any fish bigger than bait fish, makes us give up very quickly. On the way back to the van I have to come to the conclusion that fishing is a very dangerous sport: I hooked my finger! Ouch! Not badly but enough to make me squeak out loud and draw some attention towards me.

Well, it’s soup then for dinner!

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Paragliding the Alps

Video öffnet sich nicht? Geh auf http://clip.dj und füge den Link des Videos in die freie Leiste ein.

Dann das Video runter laden. Voila.

 

26/01/12

Australia Day!
This morning the valley is covered in thick fog but the top of the mountains are clear and blue. The forecast for tomorrow, Logan’s birthday, is cloudy with snow so someone might get his birthday present a day early. Well technically Logan will glide into his birthday since Australia is 8 hours ahead. Explanation following!

So we start off our day at St. Johann skiing/snowboarding and Logan has got no idea of my little birthday surprise. After 3 hours racing on blue, red and even black ski tracks, I tell Logan, we should go down to get the camera. At the car I tell him, I got bad news. We can’t go snowboarding anymore. And the second bad news: Tomorrow is bad weather. Logi looks at me all shocked and shakes his head: “No no no no! We are going back boarding now!!” “No we are not, because you will be paragliding in one hour!” “No!?!”  I smile and say “Yes” Logan: “No?!? Really??” “Yes!!” Now someone is happy and excited but first we need to make sure to fill our tummies with some food. At 2pm we are meeting Hervé from the Mountain High Adventure Centre at the Max Pub. There are country flags at the end of the ski track and we spot the Australian flag and behind it a house with a roof full of snow. An interesting image!
The conditions are perfect, the sun is out and there is no wind. Hervé gives Logan a big bag while he carries one himself and they make their way to the St. Johann gondola.
I’m waiting for them down the bottom and after about half an hour I see them gliding down the mountain. When they come closer I can hear Logan cheering while they are doing aero acrobatics and just a few minutes later two happy faces are landing in the deep puffy snow.

We are going back to the car and make our way back to the Mountain High Chalet to look at the footage and rest before going down for dinner.

 

 

 

 

 

27/01/12

Since Logan has already received his birthday present yesterday and our ski passes have run out, we start the day slowly with some work on our footage before we head out to Kirchberg and Kitzbühel around noon.
We have a browse through the towns and meet my great cousin at a pub in Kitzbühel. We actually have never met before and two years ago I didn’t even know she would exist, so it was really nice to meet her!

Kitzbühel is an interesting town. The high society is here and as we found out, Arnold Schwarzenegger was here only two days ago. We see women with expensive fur coats, Botox in their skin, fake lips and other body parts; most of them being over 50 and trying to look like 20. Then there is the rich youth scene and the gold-necklace men scene. Not worth going into detail but it is quite funny to watch.
After 4 hours of après skiing, we went back to our chalet, having missed out on our nice three-course meal and Logan clearly still in drinking mood. You only turn 33 once, don’t ya?! After another hour I went to bed and didn’t find Logan next to me until 4am.  God knows whom he was talking to or what he was talking about, we will never find out. Meister Jäger made sure he lost all his memories.

New year, new start!

 

28/01/12

Unfortunately it’s time to check out of our much loved Mountain High chalet and we would like to officially thank our hosts Hervé and Stephanie, the barmaid and the chef for looking after us so well and answering any questions we had. Also thanks to Hervé as the pilot of “Mountain High airlines” for giving Logan a once in a lifetime experience of paragliding over the Alpes.

Logan and I would have liked to extend our stay in Kirchdorf or anywhere else around the area but since holidays are about to start, every guesthouse seems to be booked out.
We are happy and grateful for this awesome week of powder fun and make our way back home to Magdeburg just to find out that the rest of Germany is also covered in snow. Yeeeeewww!!!

 

www.mountain-high.at

 

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